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Qori Q’Oncha’s cookstoves

Protect forests and improve the lives of Peru’s poorest people with efficient cookstoves

Climate impact

Reduction

Solution

Energy

Location

Peru

Evaluation

Gold Standard

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ABOUT

Learn more about the
project

It’s amazing how something as simple as a cookstove can transform lives and tackle climate change at once.

A third of people living in rural areas of Peru (around 2.4 million families) still use an open fire or traditional stove to prepare food. These fires need wood or biomass for fuel. This means cutting down trees and emitting smoke and toxic gasses that can cause serious respiratory illness.

Qori Q’oncha distributes cookstoves that use less biomass energy, emit less CO2, and are cheaper to run. And, because the fumes get released up a chimney, they’re much better for people’s health. But it doesn’t stop at the environmental and health benefits. The cookstoves are made by local people using local materials, providing them with a livelihood and boosting the local economy.

Since the beginning of the program, nearly 150,000 cookstoves have been installed in the homes of more than 700,000 people. These cookstoves radically reduce the amount of trees being cut in the area, and save a total of 1.8 million tCO2e.

Your contribution will be spent on keeping the project running over time, including monitoring, maintenance, and getting more families into the program.

Microsol

The acceptance and long-term sustainability of our projects is our primary goal. Having a clear understanding of the context and policies allows us to develop innovative solutions to help rural communities face the challenges of climate change. Our approach tailors each intervention to the needs of each community, ensuring it can be sustainable and have the most impact.

ASSESSMENT

Everything about this project at a glance.

Climate impact

Reduction

How to read this

Our atmosphere is like a bathtub, which we have been filling for decades with greenhouse gasses. Each ton of CO2e in the tub increases the global temperature and affects the climate.

In order to prevent our bathtub from spilling - which would mean reaching a +2°C temperature increase - 3 types of actions exist:

Reduction: These projects reduce emissions, closing the tap and slowing down the filling of the tub (e.g. switching to more efficient fuels)

Avoidance: These projects preventing future emissions, stopping a new tap from being opened (e.g. protecting forests and peatlands so that they don’t start releasing CO2)

Removal: These projects remove and capture greenhouse gasses, emptying the bathtub (e.g. reforestation and direct air capture technology)

Solution

Energy

How to read this

Solutions are different ways we can reduce, avoid and remove our emissions. They vary in terms of cost, level of maturity, potential to scale, and other factors. To make comparisons easier, Sweep groups solutions into categories such as Forests, Geoengineering or Buildings. Climate solutions are numerous: to learn more about what can be done, explore our catalog.

Location

Peru

How to read this

Solutions can be deployed in a large range of locations, from a micro-regions to entire sections of a continent. You might want to focus your contributions on specific areas to maximize local socioeconomic impacts or contribute where your activities are based.

Evaluation

Certified • Gold Standard

How to read this

Various international and regional standards rely on established methodologies, dedicated processes and third-party verifications to guarantee that a project delivers on its promises.

Certified: Standards, such as Gold Standard or Verra, are listed for maximal transparency

Not certified yet: The process to be certified is expensive and cumbersome, and ad-hoc methodologies might not exist for specific projects, preventing them from being certified. Sweep promotes other projects after a necessary due diligence, bringing more projects to a wider audience while also offering opportunities to develop and tailor new projects according to your own needs.

Capacity

400kt

How to read this

Capacity is the projected volume of tCO2e reduced or removed during the crediting period. This indicates the projected net impact of a project after adjusting for potential negative impacts and other externalities. This is key to assessing the current scale of a project and can give a quick estimate of what the considered volumes represent at the project scale.

Capacity does not reflect the available quantity of credits as some of them can already be sold.

Crediting Period

2018 - 2022

How to read this

Certified projects are eligible to generate carbon credits over a certain period of time. This crediting period gives a good estimate of the progress of a project.

Older crediting periods means that projects have delivered their promises and that third-party auditors have recognized the climate impact

Crediting periods covering coming years may have already been audited for a fraction of the volumes. The rest will be generated along future audits.

Co-benefits

7 SDGs

7 SDGs

SDG 1: No Poverty

412,703 members of vulnerable communities benefited

SDG 3: Good Health and Well-being

100% of beneficiaries say respiratory diseases and burns occur less often or not at all since the ICS implementation

SDG 4: Quality Education

98% of beneficiaries participated to capacity-building activities about the use and the benefits of their ICS

SDG 7: Affordable and Clean Energy

97,988 improved cookstoves installed

SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth

12 permanent jobs created by the implementation of the programme

SDG 15: Life On Land

264,780 tonnes of firewood saved by the programme

How to read this

Projects often have positive side effects beyond reducing, removing, or avoiding emissions. For example, projects might reduce waste, protect biodiversity, or support indigenous people. These co-benefits are modelled after the UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs).

Durability

N/A

How to read this

Durability only applies to to removal solutions. It indicates for how long the carbon will be removed from the atmosphere - the longer this is the more desirable. For example, storing carbon as mineral underground is more durable than in a tree, making it a less risky and longer term solution.

Financial additionality

High

How to read this

Additionality reveals the impact of your financial support. It indicates what percentage of the global project budget is coming from contributions.

High additionality means most of the project revenue relies on contributions, and they would likely not be able to happen without this financing.

Low additionality projects are less reliant on contributions.

Other additionality criteria, such as policy or regulatory additionality, are tackled through certifications and not assessed here

Barriers

Medium

The total project barrier score is available when all types of barrier are provided. It is a composite score based on the 5 barriers assessed.

Technical
Low
Financial
High
Social
Medium
Political
Low
Economical
Medium

In Peru a high number of families are used to cook with traditional stoves and there are strong cultural significations related to this. Crafting and distributing cookstoves need an important change of practices that needs to be helped by carbon revenues as the cost would be too important for Peruvian families.

How to read this

Barriers are the different hurdles a project might need to overcome. Barriers can give you a sense for the challenges a project faces, but also how it can add deeper value and create change. We differentiate five types of barriers: economic, social, institutional, technical and financial.

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